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Narrowband your license & radios NOW!

FCC Narrowbanding

In 20XX the Federal Communications Commission began modified licensing requirements for
commercial licenses in the VHF and UHF Bands. For many commercial users this means that
FCC Licenses will have to be modified to meet the new requirements by December 31, 2011.
Narrowbanding is the modification of an existing radio channel to take up half the space it used
to. This means that, in the future there will be twice the available channels there currently are.
Note that many licenses that have been created recently may already be compliant with the
narrowbanding requirements.

Narrowbanding steps:

1.

Does my license meet FCC narrowbanding requirements?

Contact us to see if your license already meets narrowbanding requirements

2.

My license does not meet narrowbanding requirements. What do I do now?

Your license will need to be modified to meet the new requirements. The FCC has steps
that need to be taken to follow the narrowband procedure. We can help you to take these
actions if you do not want to do this on your own. There is a fee for most users to modify
their license.

When changing your license with the FCC, this is the time to also make other changes if
they are necessary. Contact us if you have any other changes you would like to make to
your license. (Other charges may apply for extensive modifications)

3.

My license has been modified for narrowbanding. What is next?

Now that your license is for narrowband emissions, it is time to reprogram your radios to
actually work in narrowband channels. This process involves two major components:

a. Radios manufactured (roughly) in the last 10 years should be capable of operating
narrowband. To see if your radios are compatible (Kenwood) check here. You
can also call us if you are not sure.
b. Radios that are not narrowband-capable will need to be replaced. We offer a full
line of Kenwood mobile and portable radios, as well as base units and repeaters,
to suit all needs.

4. What happens if I don’t meet the narrowband timeline of December 31, 2011?

On January 1, 2012, if you have only wideband emissions in your license, you will no
longer be able to operate your radios. Operation of wideband radios after the deadline is
a violation of FCC rules and regulations and is subject to fines and penalties.

Timelines:

There are many licenses that need to be modified. It is in your best interest to start the
process as early as possible to avoid problems and ensure that you meet the deadline.
Remember that everyone needs to be narrowband by the end of this year, and you don’t
want to get stuck waiting in line when time runs out!
commercial licenses in the VHF and UHF Bands. For many commercial users this means that
FCC Licenses will have to be modified to meet the new requirements by December 31, 2011.
Narrowbanding is the modification of an existing radio channel to take up half the space it used
to. This means that, in the future there will be twice the available channels there currently are.
Note that many licenses that have been created recently may already be compliant with the
narrowbanding requirements.

Narrowbanding steps:

1.

Does my license meet FCC narrowbanding requirements?

Contact us to see if your license already meets narrowbanding requirements

2.

My license does not meet narrowbanding requirements. What do I do now?
commercial licenses in the VHF and UHF Bands. For many commercial users this means that
FCC Licenses will have to be modified to meet the new requirements by December 31, 2011.
Narrowbanding is the modification of an existing radio channel to take up half the space it used
to. This means that, in the future there will be twice the available channels there currently are.
Note that many licenses that have been created recently may already be compliant with the
narrowbanding requirements.

Narrowbanding steps:

1.

Does my license meet FCC narrowbanding requirements?

Contact us to see if your license already meets narrowbanding requirements

2.

My license does not meet narrowbanding requirements. What do I do now?
From plans over a decade in the making, the Federal Communications Commission has begun a "Re-Farming" program intended to expand available VHF and UHF channels by reducing channel sizing. This program requires most new and existing licensees to begin using channel widths of 12.5 KHz or less instead of the previous 25 KHz channels, starting on Jan 1st, 2013. For most commercial users this will be a two-step process; First they must modify their current FCC License to allow the new narrowband emissions required, and second, they must reprogram all radio equipment so that it utilizes the new narrow channel, all before the December 31, 2012 deadline. Note that many licenses that have been applied for recently may already be compliant with the narrowbanding requirements. Current license holders have also likely been targets of FCC "look-alike" companies wanting to modify your license for some fee. We recommend you be sure who you are dealing with, and exactly what they are going to do before proceeding with these entities. Merely changing your FCC license to include narrowband emissions without reprogramming your radio equipment to operate on them will not satisfy the narrowbanding mandate.  Commercail users can visit the FCC at: http://www.fcc.gov/encyclopedia/vhfuhf-narrowbanding-information , and Public Safety Licensees can visit the FCC at: http://transition.fcc.gov/pshs/public-safety-spectrum/narrowbanding.html
 
Narrowbanding steps:

  1.  Does my license meet FCC narrowbanding requirements?

Contact us to see if your license already meets narrowbanding requirements, or you can look at the emission designators on your current license to see if they exist.


  1. My license does not meet narrowbanding requirements.  What do I do now?

Your license will need to be modified to meet the new requirements.  The FCC has steps that need to be taken to follow the narrowband procedure.  We can help you to take these actions if you do not want to do this on your own.  There is a fee for most commercial users to modify their license.

When changing your license with the FCC, this is the time to also make other changes if they are necessary.  Contact us if you have any other changes you would like to make to your license. (Other charges may apply for extensive modifications)


  1. My license has been modified for narrowbanding.  What is next?

Now that your license allows narrowband emissions, it is time to reprogram your radios to actually work in narrowband channels.  This process involves two major components:

    1. Radios manufactured (roughly) in the last 10 years should be capable of operating narrowband, and of course you can also call us if you are not sure wether your radios are compatible.
    2. Radios that are not narrowband-capable will need to be replaced.  We offer a full line of Kenwood mobile and portable radios, as well as base units and repeaters to suit most all needs.

  1. What happens if I don’t meet the narrowband timeline of December 31, 2012?

On January 1, 2013, if you have only wideband emissions in your license, you will no longer be able to operate your radios.  Operation of wideband radios after the deadline is a violation of FCC rules and regulations and is subject to fines and penalties.  

Timelines:

Most licenses will have to be modified.  It is in your best interest to start the process as early as possible to avoid problems and ensure that you meet the deadline, especially if you have to budget for this change.  Remember that everyone needs to be narrowband by the end of this year, and you don’t want to get stuck waiting in line when time runs out. December 2012 may sound like a long way off, but it WILL be here before you know it... Be Ready!